Wednesday, July 1, 2015

7 things you need to know about returning to work after children


Jumping back into work can be a daunting prospect when you've had a substantial break, but there is little to fear.

There is absolutely no reason why you can't have a fulfilling career and a family. Things just might take a little more tweaking than before.

With a little bit of preparation and a few tips, you'll be free to drink a cup of tea or coffee whilst it's still hot in no time.

Here's a few ideas to help you make the leap:

Sunday, June 7, 2015

Two careers, a family and a marriage: How to make it all work


Imagine it is Christmas or Easter or some family event which has entailed a fair amount of preparation. You have various family members staying so you have made beds and tidied the house accordingly. There were groceries to be bought and meals planned to feed a small tribe for a few days. Presents were arranged for the various children. Tables have been set. Schedules were managed to meet the interests of as many family members as possible. You have done all that leg work single-handedly and it is now time to start cooking for the main event.

Now imagine your husband walking into the kitchen and opening the fridge. Thank god, you think to yourself. He’s getting the turkey out to start basting. Except he’s not. He grabs a beer and says he’s about to watch the football.

That exact scene played out in US journalist Brigid Schulte’s home on Thanksgiving a few years ago.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

New Harvard research: Children benefit from having a working mum


Here’s some heartening news for working mothers worried about the future of their children.

Women whose mothers worked outside the home are more likely to have jobs themselves, are more likely to hold supervisory responsibility at those jobs, and earn higher wages than women whose mothers stayed home full time, according to a new study. Men raised by working mothers are more likely to contribute to household chores and spend more time caring for family members.

The findings are stark, and they hold true across 24 countries.

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Part-time power: Can you be part-time at the top?



It's a familiar stereotype. The part-time worker (usually a woman) who has compromised on career and salary to bring up children.

Not for her the world of her full-time counterpart (usually a man) in a high-powered job, with not enough hours in the day, let alone days in the week, to respond to the e-mails, phone calls and meeting requests coming at him from all corners of the globe.

But a decade and a half into the 21st Century there are signs of a work pattern emerging that fits neither stereotype. And it isn't only for the benefit of frustrated working mothers.

It's being forged by men and women who, for whatever reason - whether it's children, elderly parents, or the pursuit of that elusive thing called work-life balance, don't want to work full-time, but are determined to do more than just "keep their hand in".

"I still feel ambitious. I want to have influence. There's an assumption that when you ask for part-time work, all those other things that made you professionally have gone out of the window, and that's just not true," says Karen Mattison, the co-founder of Timewise, which promotes flexible working.

"You're the same person inside, that's why the stigma around part-time work matters, it's the lens you might be looked at through."


Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Working from home - How to adapt to make it work with children



Lifestyle magazines and business pages seem to be full of the success stories of "Mumpreneurs" - highly successful women who have had babies and turned their home office or spare room into a money spinning success story of a business, while juggling babies and apparently having it all.

But is working from home all it's cracked up to be? The truth is, no, it isn't. Don't think that by working from home you'll be able to get work and chores done effortlessly while your small child plays happily and quietly nearby.

Working from home is hard. It requires discipline, patience, dedication, organisation and more often than not, child care.


Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Tips for time poor working mums



When I read that Madonna supposedly has 15-minute appointment blocks in her schedule for one-on-one time with each child for singing, homework, cooking, it sounded crazy to me. But how many parents have mobiles grafted to their ears, even navigating vehicles, slipping out of meetings with clients ... getting through the day managing their offspring?

Maybe Madonna's strategy is wise? We recommend to managers they have lots of short, set one-on-one times with staff. At least 15 minutes dedicated listening without interruption is one of the best gifts you can give to anyone, let alone your children. Is this really so hard to achieve?

Technology has multiplied our output, no question, and the demands placed on us have accordingly increased. You probably feel like one of those mice on a wheel, scurrying endlessly as the wheel whizzes around. You'll have noticed by now that when you mention your hyperactivity to others, they feel the urge to "top" this by claiming they are even busier. Most of us are now experiencing workplace Olympics, and while some thrive, others are drained. And what is happening to our kids? Do they simply not see us enough or see us too drained to be a wonderful interactive parent?

Sunday, February 22, 2015

How could a 4 day work week change your life?

 4 day work week Infograph in full


What would a 4 day work week look life for working parents? What would it look like for organisations? What countries are doing it? What are the results?

For the pros and cons on a 4 day work week plus some real life case examples of organisations that have implemented it check out this infograph (Click the image above for the complete infograph).

We'd love to hear your 4 day (or less) work week story and how it's worked for you and your employer!


This infograph was created by Go To Meeting.